Copyright “Rustling” in English-Language Translation: How Translators Keep (and Lose) Rights to Their Work

A newly released report, Copyright “Rustling” in English-Language Translation: How Translators Keep (and Lose) Rights to Their Work—Data from Translations Published in 2014, reveals that translators in commercial English-language publishing lose copyright to their work more than one-third of the time.

When it comes to university-press publishing, the statistics are even more dramatic: publishers fail to recognize translators’ copyright in nearly four titles in five.

This new report surveys 1332 translations published in English during 2014 to shed light on the phenomenon of copyright “rustling,” a common and alarming practice, even among some of the largest U.S. and U.K. publishers of translations.

The report also discusses what copyright “rustling” suggests for translators’ loss of contractual power and proposes strategies for resistance.

Download your copy here: Copyright “Rustling” in English-Language Translation

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